The Trail Provides: My Favorite Book

As 2020 is ushered out the door, author David Smart wins my applause for writing the best book out of the 50 or so I read this year.

As a distance trekker, I am in awe that he walked more than 2,600 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mexican border to Canada. He earns his trail name, Stayin’ Alive, many times over. As a fellow writer, I admire his honesty and entertaining narrative. He earns my hope that this is not his last book (nor distance trek).

If circumstances again keep me from a distance trail in 2021, I will pick up The Trail Provides: A Boy’s Memoir of Thru-Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, for an adventure that will not feel as vicarious as it is.

Check out my review here.

Special Camino Delivery from a U.K. Reader

A fantastic gift arrived just before Christmas in the form of a review from a reader in the United Kingdom: “I absolutely loved this book. I’ve read many Camino books and this is by far the best. So endearing and sweet and I felt like I picked up loads of tips for my upcoming Camino in 2021.”

When I sat on a bench for my first Camino lunch, I wondered if I would be able to walk across Spain to Santiago. I had no idea I would publish a book about Sue’s and my adventure. I am grateful to readers in 10 countries who have chosen to read Camino Sunrise: Walking With My Shadows.

Free Country: What a Ride!

Wearing just underwear emblazoned with the British flag, George Mahood and his buddy left Land’s End in southwest England without a penny, determined to bicycle to the northern tip of Great Britain. They would rely on the generosity and good hearts of the people, from pub owners and accommodation hosts to the police.

They would not solicit cash, but would accept meals, rooms, clothes, old bicycles and whatever else they needed. They would offer to wash dishes and do other work. They were out to prove that people are good.

If you have not read a book by George Mahood, you are in for a treat. His writing in Free Country is even more entertaining than his story’s premise and is powered by humor and down-to-earth human touches.

I doubt it will be the last George Mahood book you read.