The Buachaille: Queen of Scotland’s Mountains

If you consider yourself a mountain aficionado, then the Buachaille Etive Mor might make you forget your other loves. Poised at the entrance to Scotland’s Glen Coe, The Buachaille, as Munro-baggers refer to it, is a highlight of the West Highland Way, should the weather permit it to show off. This photo of Sue on one of our favorite treks holds a special place in my memories of 1,100 miles of backpacking in six countries. The Buachaille and the West Highland Way are among the featured characters in my second book, coming soon.

Van Life: Book Answers “Why?” and “How To?”

I congratulate Bob Wells for his practical, approachable book, How to Live in a Car, Van or RV.

At a time when van life is sweeping America as well as other parts of the world, the author presents how-to advice for those who want to live on the road. From where to park to how to install electrical power, Bob Wells’ narrative is straightforward. He covers philosophical and financial issues and van lovers will especially be drawn to the book for its practical information. He discusses life in cars and RVs, but the focus is on van life.

I prefer the comforts of my small travel trailer, but I enjoyed Wells’ story and could relate to many of the issues he covers, except, thankfully, weathering two divorces. He has gained fame through his popular YouTube channel, CheapRVLiving. Wells admits making many mistakes and taking risks he doesn’t recommend during his years living in vans.

In the past year or so, I have read three other books with the living-in-a-vehicle theme. Here are links to two of my reviews:

Walden on Wheels, by Ken Ilgunas; and Nomadland, by Jessica Bruder. I did not review Living in an RV, by Alyssa Padgett, but I recommend all three books as well as Bob Wells’ offering, which was published in 2012.

The Trail Provides: My Favorite Book

As 2020 is ushered out the door, author David Smart wins my applause for writing the best book out of the 50 or so I read this year.

As a distance trekker, I am in awe that he walked more than 2,600 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mexican border to Canada. He earns his trail name, Stayin’ Alive, many times over. As a fellow writer, I admire his honesty and entertaining narrative. He earns my hope that this is not his last book (nor distance trek).

If circumstances again keep me from a distance trail in 2021, I will pick up The Trail Provides: A Boy’s Memoir of Thru-Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, for an adventure that will not feel as vicarious as it is.

Check out my review here.