Trekking Passports Hold Treasures

Sue’s watercolor appears in Camino Sunrise.

Camino de Santiago trekkers value each unique stamp that they gather in their passports as they walk across Spain. Albergues and bars mark their signatures that certify each pilgrim’s progress toward Santiago, where compostelas are issued.

For us, the Credencial del Peregrino holds memories of albergue stays and many of our stops for coffee or a beer at the end of each day. During our trek, we carefully collected stamps, including two per day beginning in Sarria, required for the completion certificate. Today, though, the stamps in our passports hold more meaning for us than the compostelas. When I look at the stamp from our first albergue, Camino del Perdon in Uterga, I remember our first pilgrim meal, where we met four people who would become treasured friends.

Last year, we carried a Credenziale del Pellegrino along the Way of St. Francis in Italy, collecting stamps at each accommodation and some bars in order to earn our Testimonium at the Vatican. Most of the stamps lack the creativity of the Camino, but that doesn’t really matter.

A plain business stamp from Valfabbrica, Italy, recalls a wonderful moment a year ago on my birthday, when I sat with a glass of beer outside a rustic bar just a couple of feet from the road. The pink sign above my head proclaimed, “Pinky Bar.”

Cheers!

English Author Packs a Magic Touch

Have you ever…

Enjoyed a book so much that you wrote to the author?

George Mahood

I had just finished Free Country, a wild romp about two Englishmen who wore only boxer shorts as they began their journey at Land’s End, the southernmost part of England, determined to bicycle to John O’Groats, at the northern tip of Scotland.

The young men had no money–just a notebook, pen, and hearts filled with trust. Author George Mahood bet that the good will of their fellow countrymen would provide them with bicycles, food, lodging, clothing, and much more. After reading his true story, I was ready to accompany him to Las Vegas and depend on his good fortune.

But my e-mail led to more than a winning bet. It changed my life.

George wrote back and suggested I make the leap from travel blogger to book author through Amazon’s KDP program. About a year and a half later, I published my first book, Camino Sunrise, and am now working on my second.

So a big shout out to George Mahood on the release of his latest, How Not to Get Married: Confessions of a Wedding Photographer. I can hardly wait until the paperback arrives via Amazon. (Yep, it’s in ebook format too.)

I am so confident that it will be another of his humorous, insightful looks at his eventful life that I know I will be writing him another note when I finish reading.

This time, I will be writing as a fellow author, brimming with respect for George’s hard work, talent and kindness.

Camino Sunrise: Now It’s Your Turn

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My wife Sue’s ink-and-watercolor paintings highlight each chapter of Camino Sunrise.

Why did I write an adventure memoir about the Camino de Santiago?

I wrote to touch readers’ hearts, tickle funny bones, and pique curiosity.

I wrote for people who have tried long-distance trekking and for those who are considering their first hiking adventure. I wrote for armchair adventurers as well.

I wrote for people who have struggled with self-doubt, childhood bullying, and poverty.

Many readers have shared their reactions to Camino Sunrise. Many wrote that my book resonated in several of the areas I mentioned above. They found a message of hope.

I would love to hear what you think.

 

Walk Hundreds of Miles? Why Not?

This post by a fellow Camino de Santiago trekker caught my eye today. Click on the link below to read the post.

After telling someone I am going on the Camino, the number one question I get is WHY? Why am I doing it? Unfortunately, this question is not one that can be answered quickly (although if time is short I really fight the urge to just answer, “Why not?!”). While medieval pilgrims were mainly walking for […]

via Walk Hundreds of Miles? Why Not? — Curious Loca