Bicycling Crusader Follows the Silk Road

She climbed to a peak of academia as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University and later as a scientist/graduate student at MIT. She dreamed of walking on Mars.

But for Kate Harris, work inside science laboratories could not satisfy her need to discover, so she and her best friend Mel set out to get lost in the world of exploration–for a year, bicycling the Silk Road of Marco Polo from Turkey to Tibet.

Thousands of miles, at altitudes higher than 17,000 feet, over every kind of terrain you can imagine, and through blazing heat and freezing snow. They eluded and tricked menacing military and police, adapted to cultures as different as they could be, and traversed geography as foreign to them as Mars. They found human compassion in many places, including Turkey, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, China, Tibet, and Nepal as locals took them into their homes to save them from another night in their tent.

In Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, Harris eloquently and humorously weaves history, science, and compelling anecdotes from her adventure that left my jaw hanging open.

As I have learned while walking the long-distance trails of Europe, the borders of cultures, countries and languages are lost when you step outside the comforts of everyday life and push yourself to, or even beyond, your limits. On the Silk Road, Kate Harris went well beyond the limits of most humans and her book made me want to load up my backpack and leave my borders behind.

(Click on the cover if you want to see the book on Amazon.)

English Author Packs a Magic Touch

Have you ever…

Enjoyed a book so much that you wrote to the author?

George Mahood

I had just finished Free Country, a wild romp about two Englishmen who wore only boxer shorts as they began their journey at Land’s End, the southernmost part of England, determined to bicycle to John O’Groats, at the northern tip of Scotland.

The young men had no money–just a notebook, pen, and hearts filled with trust. Author George Mahood bet that the good will of their fellow countrymen would provide them with bicycles, food, lodging, clothing, and much more. After reading his true story, I was ready to accompany him to Las Vegas and depend on his good fortune.

But my e-mail led to more than a winning bet. It changed my life.

George wrote back and suggested I make the leap from travel blogger to book author through Amazon’s KDP program. About a year and a half later, I published my first book, Camino Sunrise, and am now working on my second.

So a big shout out to George Mahood on the release of his latest, How Not to Get Married: Confessions of a Wedding Photographer. I can hardly wait until the paperback arrives via Amazon. (Yep, it’s in ebook format too.)

I am so confident that it will be another of his humorous, insightful looks at his eventful life that I know I will be writing him another note when I finish reading.

This time, I will be writing as a fellow author, brimming with respect for George’s hard work, talent and kindness.